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(2016)DC: Rebirth

It’s been a while since I posted here and what better time than with the rebirth of the DC universe. (Spoilers ahead)I want to start by making it clear that I am pretty much out of current comic reading. The only book I am collecting monthly is Dark Knight III, and I am only somewhat following Justice League and Batman. But I will not blame that on the quality of the New 52 or the state of comics in general. Yes, I do prefer to follow certain writers and it is harder to do that when there is little to no crossover with their other works such as was the case when the big writers weren’t leaving for indie projects. No, this is mostly a result of my focus being elsewhere and not having the time I want for reading. I am writing a comic of my own which I put a lot of work into, and I am trying to exposr myself to other works outside of comics more.


But I did feel like I was at the point where comics couldn’t really show me something new. I had become stagnant.

And then Geoff Johns punched me in the brain with yesterday’s DC Universe: Rebirth #1.

For those of you who have not read it, I heavily advise you to. For those of you who have, then you know that it is a highly self aware analysis and testament to what has been going on in the world of comics since Watchmen. Essentially it told us that Watchmen brought a darkness into the world of comics, that the New 52 was a result of that darkness, and that there is a brightness returning to the world.

In the book that brightness manifested itself through our protagonist, the original Wally West. This felt perfect to me. Being that this is one of Johns last issues for the next little while, it felt right that it touch upon many points of his great (both in size and in quality) career. He built on Wally’s story, built on Flashpoint, brought us back the JSA (a book he spent a long time on) brought back the Ted Kord version of Blue Beetle (one of my favourite  characters, that he killed back in Countdown to Infinite Crisis, my first ever DC buy), and reunited Aquaman and Mera. All this while still pushing forward from the happenings  of his JLA run and the recent Superman comics.

I know that there is a lot of controversy with the decision to bring the Watchmen into the fold. Personally, I feel he did them justice, and for those that don’t like it, there is no reason they have to let it affect how they feel about the original works. Johns said something about how Watchmen  made an impact on comics 30 years ago, it is time comics made an impact on the Watchmen. Something like that. The way he said it made it sound justified.

I appreciate the book for taking me to the edge of emotional turmoil, thinking that Wally was finished, then snapping me back. The book is one of the most emotional I have ever read (maybe second to the death of the Question).

I am in a place of feeling positive, hopefull, and excited for both the past and the future. I always love these crisis style shake ups and how they introduce me to things I know about but have not explored and this was no exception. The first thing I did when I was done I ran out and bought all of the All New Atom series so I could learn about Ryan Choi. I also brought out my old blue beetle comics and Watchmen.

Actually the first thing I did was read it again.

Anyway, those are my thoughts. Let me know what you thought. Thanks for reading.

1974: OMAC, The Original Master’s Awesome Classic

OMAC1September-October1974-1.jpg~originalWhen I was looking at 1974 the big creations in comics were Wolverine and Punisher, but I thought; why look at characters that everybody knows, and that I don’t care that much about. Yeah, I love Wolverine, but everybody does, so he gets plastered everywhere, there probably isn’t much I could talk about that isn’t universally known. And Punisher, well, I’m not a fan. I have a few Punisher TPB’s simply because of who’s writing, not based on any liking or following of the character. But OMAC… OMAC is someone whom I took a liking too since the first issue of his that I read, which was OMAC #1 by Jack Kirby. Yep, this is another Kirby classic. In fact, the last big character he created for DC. He did a few more series with Marvel after this and other work elsewhere, but this was his last entry into the DC mythos.  Continue reading